The last two weeks of July signaled the departure of many snook from our local beaches.  With spawning activity over, these fish have spread back out….some larger fish probably moving a little bit offshore while many other fish have taken up residence along intercostal islands, on local flats and further up into backcountry areas such as bayou and canals. The net affect of this is that fewer fish are being caught and the average size is down a bit, but don’t count out the possibility of still hooking a big fish or two.  With fish more dispersed and less aggressive due to the warm temperatures, catching enough white bait to effectively chum is important. By putting 30 – 40 baits out into a likely holding area, fish will reveal themselves as they chase these baits, oftentimes catching them at the surface.  Additionally, fish that may not be actively feeding may turn on with the abundance of dining opportunities. A snook that chases down a whitebait will very likely eat the next bait cast into the same area…so chum, wait for the boil, then cast to the exact spot of the boil. Heavier tackle may be required this time of year as well as, if snook have structure that they can reach, rest assured they will make every attempt to get to it.
Most charters over the last few weeks have resulted in a handful of snook and generally a larger handful of reds.  Redfish are among the more temperature tolerant fish and will continue to eat, even as water temps approach ninety degrees. Early July trips consistently yielded a fish or two of 30 inches or larger, but during the back half of the month, fish from 18 – 26 inches seemed to be the norm.  Two early August charters did produce fish in the 30 inch range again though so maybe the larger fish are back around. Bottom line is that August is a tough month to fish so make sure to target days with strong tides, as this are the best days to catch redfish, which is the most logical fish to target at this time. Whole small pinfish and cut baits are all that’s needed to entice this species to eat.  Both can be fished with split shots or under a bobber.  
Big trout action is fairly non existent during August.  Reefs dwellers like snapper and mackerel generally find August a little warm and will likely re-appear in the next 6 weeks or so. Good luck and good fishing.

ntaylor

ntaylor

Former baseball umpire, now fishing guide. Graduate of the University of Arizona.
ntaylor

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